1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar
 
 
     
 
U.™ Advisor
Find a College
College Roadmap
Getting Into College
Standardized Tests
Admissions Essay
U.™ Advisor Home
U.™ Advisor Articles
The College App
Admission vs. Rejection
Community College
College Requirements
Not in the Brochures
Come to My Kollege!
Are the SAT's Fair?
More Articles >
Featured College
Argosy University
Campuses:
  • Atlanta
  • Chicago
  • Chicago Northwest
  • Dallas
  • Denver
  • Honolulu
  • Nashville
  • Orange County
  • Phoenix
  • San Francisco Bay Area
  • Sarasota
  • Seattle
  • Tampa
  • Twin Cities
  • Washington DC

 

The Standardized Tests

SAT More >
Scholastic Assessment Test
Because high-schools throughout the country have varying grading and instructional standards, high-school G.P.A. by itself is not an accurate predictor of college performance. The SAT serves as a standard by which colleges and universities can measure a student's reasoning abilities to predict how well he or she might do at their college. The SAT does not test how much you know. Rather, it tests your math and verbal reasoning abilities, and compares it to the abilities of students from other high-schools. Each of the 2 sections on the SAT are scored from 200(lowest) to 800(highest), for a maximum of 1600.
Click here for the SAT dates and registration deadlines for the 2007-2008 school year.

Subject Tests More >
Scholastic Assessment Test: Subject Tests
The SAT Subject Tests are 1-hour exams that fall into 5 subject categories: English, Mathematics, History, Science, and Foreign Language. The SAT II has grown in importance, partially due to the controversy of the SAT I's fairness, and is now a major component to most schools' admissions and course placement processes. Students are often required to take 3 SAT II subject tests, in addition to the SAT I. Most, but usually not all, SAT II Subject Tests are given 6 times a year. Click here for the SAT II dates and registration deadlines for the 2007-2008 school year.


PSAT/NMSQT More >
Preliminary SAT/National Merit Qualifying Test
The PSAT is has the same format as the SAT, and is administered to high-school sophomores and juniors each October. PSAT scores from the junior year count toward eligibility for the National Merit Scholarship. The scores are meant to serve as a rough prediction for scores on the real SAT, which is taken later. PSAT scores range from 20 to 80. To translate a PSAT score to SAT format, multiply the score by 10. While the PSAT is a rough predictor of SAT performance, it does not guarantee accuracy. You can significantly improve your real SAT with early preparation.

ACT More >
American College Testing Program
This test consists of four 35-50 minute tests in English, math, reading, and science reasoning. Scores range from 36(highest) to 1(lowest). The ACT used to be used primarily by colleges in the Midwest, but now its acceptance as a substitute for the SAT I is expanding. Consult with your high-school counselor or the Colleges.com College Search Engine to find out if a school requires or accepts that ACT. Go to the ACT Web site to find out how to register online.

TOEFL More >
Test of English as a Foreign Language
The TOEFL is a computer-administered English proficiency exam given to students whose native language is one other than English. See your high-school counselor to find out if you need to take the TOEFL. You can find the minimum TOEFL scores for colleges by using the Colleges.com College Search Engine.

AP
Advanced Placement
These 3-hour long exams are based on AP high-school classes - which model full-year college level courses. Administered each May, the AP Exam scores range from 1(lowest) to 5(highest). High AP scores (4 or above) usually allow high-school students to receive college credit for the respective subject matter. A student who receives a score of 4 or higher on three AP Exams is considered an "AP Scholar."


U.™ Advisor

What is U.™ Advisor, and how can it help me get into college?

Articles About College Admissions
Everything from advice columns written by high-school students to editorials about standardized tests. Whatever your question is, you can find it here.

Standardized Tests
Get the scoop on each of the standardized tests.

Find a College or University
Find the schools with the characteristics that match your personality.